Retail


In the latest episode of eMarketer's "Behind the Numbers" podcast, analyst Andrew Lipsman discusses the failure of Sears, and what its long decline says about the retail sector as a whole.

The retail industry is no stranger to data breaches, and unsurprisingly, consumers have little confidence that retailers can keep their personal data safe from hackers, according to findings from First Data.

First books, now … mattresses? Amazon and a host of new brands are shaking up the mattress industry and remaking the customer journey. eMarketer’s Andrew Lipsman lays out the facts and data.

A new National Retail Federation study examines what it is calling "value shoppers," the 89% of US consumers who frequent discount retailers. With a figure that high, this behavior transcends gender, region, income and age.

From 1-hour delivery to drive-thru grocery pickup to offering myriad payment methods, convenience rules for the modern shopper. But when it comes to actual convenience stores, one of the only things going for them is being in the right place at the right time.

More than half of respondents (54%) plan to shop for premium groceries this holiday season, according to a recent survey from Accenture.

Omnichannel retailing means meeting shoppers' expectations in their channel of choice, digital or physical. That is forcing many retailers to break out of their routines and experiment with new models. And it’s not just brick-and-mortar sellers that are being pressed to change.

Amazon recently unveiled its first Amazon Go convenience store outside of its home market of Seattle, putting down brick and mortar roots in Chicago. eMarketer's principal retail analyst, Andrew Lipsman, took a spin through the aisles of the new store and reports back on the experience in the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers."

What once sounded fantastical—stores where shoppers could walk out with purchases without waiting in line—is becoming a reality for more than a select few.

Tom Doctoroff, chief cultural insights officer at Prophet, spoke about the drivers of luxury consumption in China.

News this week of Sears filing for bankruptcy protection wasn't exactly a shock to anyone. According to a new Adthena study that looked into how digital commerce competition affected Sears, the retailer fared poorly compared with its counterparts.

Like customer experience and digital transformation, the need for innovation has become a priority across industries. Retail is no exception. A new PYMNTS and AEVI survey examined what is motivating retailers to innovate payments. The biggest driver to innovate was competition (84.6%). No one wants to get left behind, and many just want to be on a level playing field.

Social media is hardly synonymous with shopping, but that hasn't stopped social platforms from positioning themselves as pseudo-retailers.

Emerging retail tech straddles the line between utilitarian and useless. Improving the customer experience is usually the end goal but when it's implemented just for the sake of showing off, consumers don't always find it useful. According to a June 2018 JDA Software survey, consumers were receptive to the idea of retail tech.

Ryan Fagan, director of sales and operations planning at Lowe’s, spoke about how the home-improvement brand overhauled the way it verifies which customers are eligible for discounts.

Jaime Bettencourt, senior vice president of premier sales and account management at Mood Media, explains why retailers shouldn't neglect the brick-and-mortar experience.

Consumers in China spent $118.39 billion on luxury goods in 2017, far more than consumers in the US, Europe, Japan or the rest of the world.

Lili Chen, general manager of Alibaba's luxury ecommerce platform Luxury Pavilion, spoke about how digital can help amplify the luxury shopping experience.

Are consumers eating out more frequently or are they preparing more meals at home? According to new NPD Group data, over 80% of meals were prepared and eaten at home in 2017. US consumers dined out 185 times last year, down from the 2000 peak when that figure was 216.

No retailer would admit they weren't interested in innovation, but not all agree on what counts as innovation, how to execute it or what the point even is. But all retailers agreed that providing a better customer experience was the top opportunity for innovating.