Retail


Store closures are the hallmark of the so-called retail apocalypse, but the demise of brick-and-mortar locations might be more apparent to industry watchers. The average consumer doesn't always pay attention—unless a particular store meant something to them.

Online shopping has become a sport during Thanksgiving week and beyond, and it's also starting to play a role in the holiday meal itself. In many ways, the convenience of buying groceries online seems well-suited for larger-than-usual gatherings, even if it is used by only a small number of consumers.

Amazon is already one of the top digital retailers in Canada. But that may not be the case with digital grocery, a highly competitive space where established players are vying to fill up virtual shopping carts. eMarketer spoke with Michael LeBlanc, founder and principal of M.E. LeBlanc & Company, about Amazon's role in the country's overall ecommerce landscape and its digital grocery sector.

Amazon Go has received a lot of attention for a store with only six locations in three cities. It's not hard to see why, since the "walk out without paying" concept is novel, and eliminating friction is the holy grail of omnichannel retailing.

Even though food and beverage has traditionally been a product category with low digital penetration in the US—we peg the category at 2.8% of all retail ecommerce sales for 2018—online sales are steadily picking up steam.

Even though supermarkets have upped their digital commerce offerings over the past few years and online grocery shopping has been on the rise, a good number of US consumers just aren't that interested in having groceries delivered.

The retail industry is no stranger to data breaches, and unsurprisingly, consumers have little confidence that retailers can keep their personal data safe from hackers, according to findings from First Data.

Like customer experience and digital transformation, the need for innovation has become a priority across industries. Retail is no exception. A new PYMNTS and AEVI survey examined what is motivating retailers to innovate payments. The biggest driver to innovate was competition (84.6%). No one wants to get left behind, and many just want to be on a level playing field.

A new National Retail Federation study examines what it is calling "value shoppers," the 89% of US consumers who frequent discount retailers. With a figure that high, this behavior transcends gender, region, income and age.

Emerging retail tech straddles the line between utilitarian and useless. Improving the customer experience is usually the end goal but when it's implemented just for the sake of showing off, consumers don't always find it useful. According to a June 2018 JDA Software survey, consumers were receptive to the idea of retail tech.

In this special webinar panel of eMarketer analysts you'll learn the market forces changing the ways consumers shop for consumer packaged goods, and the drivers affecting how CPG companies sell to consumers.

Every week on eMarketer’s “Behind the Numbers” podcast, we take a few minutes to discuss some of the most intriguing headlines of the past seven days. This week, we're chatting about Bitcoin, tech taxes, and a novel you can read on FB Messenger.

Buying store brands used to be viewed as sacrificing quality for price, but post-recession private labels began flourishing and have gained popularity with retailers and consumers over the past decade.

Online grocery sales are reaching a tipping point, a fact that was a given at the inaugural Groceryshop conference held this week. Overall themes of digital transformation and the power of the consumer emerged while Amazon was mentioned less often than you might think.

Despite ups and downs in the subscription commerce segment, it's still a subject of great interest in the retail industry. Most brands that started online and direct to consumer have expanded to retail channels, either through partnerships or acquisitions.

In the latest episode of eMarketer's "Behind the Numbers" podcast, analyst Andrew Lipsman discusses the failure of Sears, and what its long decline says about the retail sector as a whole.

News this week of Sears filing for bankruptcy protection wasn't exactly a shock to anyone. According to a new Adthena study that looked into how digital commerce competition affected Sears, the retailer fared poorly compared with its counterparts.

Social media is hardly synonymous with shopping, but that hasn't stopped social platforms from positioning themselves as pseudo-retailers.

First books, now … mattresses? Amazon and a host of new brands are shaking up the mattress industry and remaking the customer journey. eMarketer’s Andrew Lipsman lays out the facts and data.

From 1-hour delivery to drive-thru grocery pickup to offering myriad payment methods, convenience rules for the modern shopper. But when it comes to actual convenience stores, one of the only things going for them is being in the right place at the right time.