Advertising & Marketing


This year, mobile will surpass TV ad spending by more than $6 billion, according to our latest ad spending forecast. By 2020, the channel will represent 43% of total media ad spending in the US—a greater percentage than all traditional media combined.

Invasive and retargeted ads are turning some people to ad blocking. Surveys indicate that users are increasingly finding digital ads to be too intrusive.

Marketers continue to struggle with how to best credit a purchase, and the challenges in fixing this issue are not primarily technological.

This year will mark a milestone for digital video advertising in the US, according to eMarketer’s latest ad spending forecast. In 2018, video will grow nearly 30% to $27.82 billion. That means video ad spending will make up 25% of US digital ad spending.

Agency executives tell eMarketer about why consumers got ahead of advertisers on digital.

Recent improvements in computer-vision technology have finally made this dream a reality, and the biggest technology companies, including Pinterest, Google, Amazon, Microsoft and eBay, now have visual search tools.

Do brands live up to their promises to consumers? Much of the time, the answer is no, and a recent study suggests that the ramifications of that can be very bad news for brands that fall short of expectations.

Political ad spend estimates have been revised higher amid an increasingly contentious election season. TV broadcasters will win many of these added dollars, moderating a longer-term downward revenue trend.

In the latest episode of eMarketer's "Behind the Numbers" podcast, we dig into a variety of data about news consumption on social properties. How many people get their news on social? And do they trust it?

Undertone's Mike Pallad and Laura Salant discuss the importance of measuring attention in digital ad campaigns.

John Egan, head of demand, EMEA, at mobile app ad exchange MoPub, a Twitter company, discusses how marketers are continuing to work on cracking the code on in-app programmatic advertising.

Emerging retail tech straddles the line between utilitarian and useless. Improving the customer experience is usually the end goal but when it's implemented just for the sake of showing off, consumers don't always find it useful. According to a June 2018 JDA Software survey, consumers were receptive to the idea of retail tech.

If you think consumers want brands to be neutral on social issues, you would be wrong. Belief-driven buyers—consumers who choose, switch, avoid or boycott a brand based on its stand on societal issues—are the majority in 2018.

Which “reality” are marketers opting for—virtual reality or augmented reality? As the two technologies evolve, adoption patterns differ. VR remains largely rooted in the gaming industry, whereas AR is becoming mainstream thanks to a host of technological advances and big-tech backing that makes it accessible on smartphones.

Augmented reality investors, marketers and tech providers weigh in on why the market is ready for AR—and why it's the right time for marketers to make their move.

Ed LaHood, CEO of augmented reality platform Thyng, talks about the state of the AR ecosystem, how it's changing and what that means for marketers.

Marketers say that users’ fragmented media consumption is disrupting their TV advertising approach.

Jascha Kaykas-Wolff, CMO of Mozilla, spoke about the need for a faster and cleaner browsing experience.