Marketing Technology


As use of AI grows (27% of executives in a PwC study have already implemented AI), so do calls for ways to interpret how AI models make decisions. This has given rise to a new buzzword: explainable AI, which refers to algorithms that make decisions humans can explain. PwC, for example, says it “integrates risk mitigation and ethical concerns into algorithms and data sets from the start.”

The inaccuracies of last-click attribution are well-documented, yet many marketers still rely on it.

TV ad buying is unlikely to follow the real-time bidding model that became popular with digital advertising. However, many TV advertising tasks—including reporting, creative placement and measurement—are likely to become more automated.

Amid prevalent data breaches and growing consumer distrust over personal data, regulators are becoming more stringent on imposing fines for those who violate privacy laws.

Artificial intelligence is no longer just a buzzword, and hefty investments signal that stakeholders are planning to ramp up efforts in 2019.

Advertisers are investing in products that help them accurately identify the audiences they plan to target. In recent years, a few ID consortiums launched to give advertisers an audience identification alternative to the Facebook-Google duopoly.

Marketers rely heavily on third parties for analytics and technology building. Many are looking to trim their overall vendor counts when it comes to demand-side platforms and supply-side platforms, but are looking for new partners for customer data platforms, while others are building their own tech in-house.

The multilayered approach that scammers use to siphon money highlights the cat-and-mouse problem of policing ad fraud.

Some media companies are finding that they can create new revenue lines by selling their data.

According to a new study of US publishing executives, programmatic is leading people to worry more about downward pressures on CPMs than tech taxes or latency.

Data privacy battles are heating up now that a group of US senators are asking regulators to investigate how telecom firms are selling people's location data.

For blockchain to have an impact on ad fraud, all parties to a programmatic transaction must agree to use it—and use the same system. Thus, adoption has been limited.

Consumers don’t fully trust retailers with their data. But, they’ll put their reservations aside for the right price.

To satisfy their most loyal advertisers, some media companies are creating new data-driven ad products and services.

With spend on marketing technology increasing, many marketers are investing more dollars into data management products.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," analyst Nicole Perrin digs into the marketing technology tech stack, and looks ahead to the privacy challenges that marketers will face in 2019.

Privacy laws and data scandals have thrust third-party data in the spotlight. In the meantime, most marketers continue to rely on data they obtain from other firms.

With store closures and bankruptcies—Toys 'R' Us, Sears and Brookstone, to name a few—showing no signs of letting up, it raises the question of what sets a successful retailer apart from the rest.

While adoption of multichannel attribution models is increasing, the growth rate has slowed. eMarketer lowered its 2018 multichannel attribution adoption estimates from 62.0% to 54.0%.

One of the most crucial aspects of setting up artificial intelligence products is making sure that a clear strategy is driving its adoption.