Automotive


In terms of the allocations of spend across industries, 2020 will be a story of two trends. On one hand, digital ad investments (and advertising investments overall, for that matter) in some sectors will decline immensely as a result of those industries facing insurmountable barriers. On the other, the pandemic will allow certain other industries to remain resilient in terms of digital spend, with relatively strong growth forecasts for the year. It comes as no surprise that the automotive and travel industries will experience huge spending declines in 2020. As the UK imposed strict lockdown rules, pretty much all travel was nixed for several months. Investment in digital advertising by these two industries will thus suffer, with spend declining by 20.4% for auto and by 36.7% for travel this year.

With the shuttering of amusement parks and cancellation of live events, the entertainment industry will see some of the biggest declines in digital ad spending this year, eclipsed only by the travel, auto, and media industries.

Jürgen Stackmann, member of the board of management at Volkswagen passenger cars for sales, marketing and after sales, speaks with eMarketer vice president of business development Marissa Coslov about the automaker’s response to the coronavirus pandemic, the importance of social listening and more.

While some consumers haven’t changed their stance about shopping for a car online, others have altered their views about it since the spread of the coronavirus.

In a marketplace crowded with competition, ride-hailing pioneer Uber still dominates the US transportation-sharing economy. But as the first mover's growth slows, its main competitor Lyft will increasingly claim market share.

Lingering uncertainty over Brexit has had an impact on all industries across the British economy, but the automotive sector has been hit particularly hard, which has affected how much it can spend on digital ads.

eMarketer analysts discuss our digital ad spend by industry forecasts, exploring verticals such as automotive, CPG, financial services, healthcare and pharmaceutical, travel and retail.

Boris Johnson, who was sworn in as the new British prime minister last week, declared early on that the UK will leave the EU by October 31. The divisive topic has already claimed two prime ministers and on the surface, there’s a tone of certainty about Johnson’s plans: He has filled his cabinet with Brexiteers, and he’s adamant that a no-deal Brexit will be the default option for “Brexit Day v2” should negotiations with the EU come to nothing.

eMarketer senior forecasting analyst Cindy Liu breaks down our car and retail spending numbers and three factors behind the softening sales. Watch now.

In a challenging year for advertising worldwide, Germany will experience a slowdown similar to that of every other market we track. Germany’s digital ad spending had grown at double-digit rates for each of the past three years, but pandemic-disrupted 2020 will see that growth slow to just 0.8%.

The US automotive industry will spend just $10.94 billion on digital advertising this year, down by 18.2% from 2019.

In 2020's pandemic-ravaged economy, Uber and Lyft will share in the pain. Usage for both services has been highly correlated with various local and statewide lockdown orders, and although we expect both companies will see better figures in H2 2020 than they did in H1, neither will get close to their 2019 numbers until next year.

eMarketer principal analyst Victoria Petrock discusses the shifting mindset toward worker, assistant and delivery robots and offers some examples of how they are already helping people everyday. She also explains what's holding drones back and when to expect driverless cars on the roads. Then Victoria and senior research analyst Dane Finley talk about whether telehealth is here to stay, the significance of Alexa's longer-form speaking voice and whether virtual reality is capitalizing on stay-at-home measures.

While the COVID-19 pandemic is creating a major drag on the global economy, it’s helping to accelerate the development and commercialization of several emerging technologies that have, until now, received lukewarm public and/or government support.

As the realities of Brexit finally hit, will the purse strings tighten?

Germany’s auto industry is central to the economy of the country and the region. But because of macroeconomic trends—like the volatility of the US-China trade negotiations and US President Donald Trump’s mixed trade signals on German cars—the automotive sector in Germany is underspending on ads compared with other industries. The medium-term prognosis remains uncertain.

We expect a shift in US digital ad spending next year, as economic factors weigh on certain industries. In 2020, financial services will displace the auto sector, while travel will surpass consumer packaged goods (CPG).

US auto and auto parts sales in the US are slowing, which will weigh down the entire retail sector. This year, the auto industry will grow 2.0% to $1.299 trillion, the slowest growth rate since at least 2011. Growth will flatten through 2022, according to eMarketer’s latest US retail forecast.

eMarketer forecasting director Shelleen Shum breaks down our ad spend numbers for the US auto sector. While estimates are showing a growth slowdown for 2019, video and search are bucking the overall trend. Watch now.