Media & Entertainment


This year, we expect 46.0 million US households will use a smart TV at least once per month, a 16.0% increase from 2017.

This year, we expect 170.1 million people in the US will use a subscription OTT service, like Netflix—making up 60.8% of internet users.

Alibaba's Singles' Day, China's massive ecommerce festival held annually on November 11, has grown to surpass pretty much every other online shopping event in the world.

In the first of a three-part series on digital video and TV, analyst Paul Verna breaks down the data on ad spending and subscription fees. When will digital video ad spend catch up with TV ad spend? How much subscription income is flowing into services like Netflix and Hulu?

Ad tech vendors and digitally savvy publishers would like to cash in on the digitization of TV advertising. But that may take a while.

Although connected TV advertising makes up a small portion of overall video ad spending, and has its share of challenging dynamics, it’s expected to grow in the coming years as audiences continue to embrace digital streaming on their living room screens. Paul Verna, eMarketer’s principal analyst, video, examines the connected TV space through the lens of advertising opportunities and challenges.

Emerging retail tech straddles the line between utilitarian and useless. Improving the customer experience is usually the end goal but when it's implemented just for the sake of showing off, consumers don't always find it useful. According to a June 2018 JDA Software survey, consumers were receptive to the idea of retail tech.

Augmented reality investors, marketers and tech providers weigh in on why the market is ready for AR—and why it's the right time for marketers to make their move.

Marketers say that users’ fragmented media consumption is disrupting their TV advertising approach.

In the latest episode of “Behind the Numbers,” eMarketer’s Ross Benes talks with Jon Romano, vice president of agency development at SpotX, about how ad buyers accidentally overlook connected TV inventory.

In the final episode of our three-part series on the TV and digital video ecosystem, analyst Paul Verna focuses on the question of content. How much content is being created and who are the leading creators? Can the torrid pace of creation continue, or will it ease up?

In the second part of our three-part podcast series on the shifting TV and digital video ecosystem, we're focusing on the audience. Analyst Paul Verna talks about mobile viewers, cord cutters, connected TV watchers and more.

Creative professionals would rather work on projects centered around emerging technologies than spending more time coding, according to a recent study.

Joshua Dyck, professor and co-director of the Center for Public Opinion at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, discusses why esports has drawn so many teens, and how advertisers can insert themselves into the gaming community.

eMarketer analysts walk you through today’s video landscape with our latest forecasts.

Which “reality” are marketers opting for—virtual reality or augmented reality? As the two technologies evolve, adoption patterns differ. VR remains largely rooted in the gaming industry, whereas AR is becoming mainstream thanks to a host of technological advances and big-tech backing that makes it accessible on smartphones.

Ed LaHood, CEO of augmented reality platform Thyng, talks about the state of the AR ecosystem, how it's changing and what that means for marketers.

Millennials may not watch as much TV as previous generations, but their engagement with the TV content they do watch may actually be deeper than other groups.

Every week on eMarketer’s “Behind the Numbers” podcast, we take a few minutes to discuss some of the most intriguing headlines of the past seven days. This week, some of the topics we’re talking about include Walmart's entry to New York City and a new way to buy concert tickets.