Retail & Ecommerce

Marketers have long turned to social media to hear and respond to what people are saying, gauge sentiment, and inform and support their team's marketing strategy. But the coronavirus pandemic has put fresh emphasis on the practice known as social listening.

Few industries have been hit as hard by the coronavirus as travel. Recovery will be slow, with many sectors not returning to pre-pandemic levels until at least 2022. Some pandemic-related trends, like increased local “staycations,” may persist.

The pandemic has pushed many consumers to shift their shopping behaviors, with many now turning to their mobile device for their shopping needs.

Business and marketing plans conceived earlier in the year seem to be no longer suitable in a COVID-19 world.

The retail divide among top performers and the rest of the market has been amplified by the coronavirus pandemic.

Total retail sales worldwide are expected to hit $23.358 trillion in 2020, down 5.7% from 2019—and nearly 12% below our pre-pandemic estimate of $26.459 trillion.

Since stay-at-home orders were put in place, more adults in the US have significantly increased their alcohol purchases.

The pandemic has hit Spain hard, affecting all industries within the country, particularly retail.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver, junior analyst Blake Droesch and vice president of content studio at Insider Intelligence Paul Verna discuss whether cinemas can survive, TV streaming price hikes, Peloton's Roku app, whether TikTok will be banned in the US, Uber buying Postmates, why airplane food tastes so bad and more.

Fewer people in the US are using rideshare services during the pandemic. According to July 2020 data from CivicScience, 71% of respondents ages 18 to 24 said they have stopped using rideshare services.

Since its launch in 2017, Peace Out Skincare—known for its Acne Dot patches—has been rapidly expanding its business through an exclusive partnership with Sephora, as well as its own direct-to-consumer (D2C) business.

eMarketer analyst Ross Benes, forecasting analyst Eric Haggstrom and principal analyst at Insider Intelligence Andrew Lipsman discuss how the tech giants are coming for your TV. They then talk about why lululemon athletica bought connected fitness startup Mirror, why premium loyalty programs are in fashion and what happens when stay-at-home orders end.

If the coronavirus pandemic has produced any winners in the retail sector, digital merchants are among that number.

China is the largest digital market in the world, leading all countries in terms of ecommerce, mcommerce and social commerce. It’s also home to many of the largest ecommerce conglomerates, including Alibaba and JD.com, who are generating sales at a scale that far exceeds that of companies in the US—including Amazon.

After eMarketer's February 2020 forecast projected modest growth of 2.8% to $5.621 trillion in total US retail sales, the coronavirus pandemic then took the US economy by storm, causing closures, stay-at-home orders, and a decline in the demand of non-essential goods.

Among holiday shopping events in China, many outside the country have probably only heard of Singles’ Day. However, 618—which ecommerce giant JD.com launched to commemorate the company’s founding day—is gaining popularity. And given the global interest in a post-pandemic retail rebound, this year’s event was particularly worthy of attention.

eMarketer principal analyst Debra Aho Williamson and junior analysts Blake Droesch and Nina Goetzen at Insider Intelligence discuss the recent conversation around a Facebook ad boycott. They then talk about why Zynn ditched its pay-to-watch feature, Snapchat's announcements and why WhatsApp's digital payments service in Brazil was suspended so quickly.

It’s long been understood that US retail is over-stored. The US has more retail space per capita than any other country in the world, according to a 2018 analysis by Cowen and Company, at about 23.5 square feet per person compared to Canada, which is second on the list at 16.8 square feet.