Video


Just like their younger cohorts, Gen Xers are shifting their viewing habits from traditional TV to digital video.

This year, 64.8 million millennials will watch digital video at least once a month, according to eMarketer estimates. That figure will continue to increase year over year, reaching 66.8 million by 2022.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," we dig into a new study about YouTube usage. What kinds of content are users consuming, and what drives additional views?

In the final episode of our three-part series on the TV and digital video ecosystem, analyst Paul Verna focuses on the question of content. How much content is being created and who are the leading creators? Can the torrid pace of creation continue, or will it ease up?

In the second part of our three-part podcast series on the shifting TV and digital video ecosystem, we're focusing on the audience. Analyst Paul Verna talks about mobile viewers, cord cutters, connected TV watchers and more.

In today's episode of "Behind the Numbers," eMarketer's Paul Verna breaks down Netflix's latest results and asks who are its most credible challengers in the streaming space?

eMarketer analysts walk you through today’s video landscape with our latest forecasts.

US social network video ad revenues will grow sharply over the next several years, reaching $11.69 billion by 2020, according to eMarketer's new estimates. And one company in particular will win the lion's share: Facebook.

In primarily English-language countries, Netflix has a clear track record of success, with a majority of over-the-top users in those markets using its services. But if it hasn’t filled out its slate of localized content, adoption is slower.

Scott Rosenberg, Roku’s senior vice president and general manager of platform, spoke about how the digital video company approaches programmatic ad selling.

While kids are not likely to own a smartphone or have a large social media presence, video dominates their digital activity.

This year, we expect 46.0 million US households will use a smart TV at least once per month, a 16.0% increase from 2017.

This year, we expect 170.1 million people in the US will use a subscription OTT service, like Netflix—making up 60.8% of internet users.

In 2018, digital devices and platforms are central to almost every dimension of daily life for consumers and businesses around the world. Yet traditional media—notably TV—still claim a significant amount of time as well, even among internet users. While consumer trends are clearly evident across the 40 markets featured in the Global Media Intelligence Report, inevitably, there are intriguing outliers with respect to device penetration and the adoption of social media, time-shifted TV and other activities.

In the first of a three-part series on digital video and TV, analyst Paul Verna breaks down the data on ad spending and subscription fees. When will digital video ad spend catch up with TV ad spend? How much subscription income is flowing into services like Netflix and Hulu?

Although connected TV advertising makes up a small portion of overall video ad spending, and has its share of challenging dynamics, it’s expected to grow in the coming years as audiences continue to embrace digital streaming on their living room screens. Paul Verna, eMarketer’s principal analyst, video, examines the connected TV space through the lens of advertising opportunities and challenges.

This year will mark a milestone for digital video advertising in the US, according to eMarketer’s latest ad spending forecast. In 2018, video will grow nearly 30% to $27.82 billion. That means video ad spending will make up 25% of US digital ad spending.

Every week on eMarketer’s “Behind the Numbers” podcast, we take a few minutes to discuss some of the most intriguing headlines of the past seven days. This week, some of the topics we’re talking about include how teens are turning to Instagram to make some extra money, plus how ecommerce and low prices may be turning some consumers into hoarders.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," eMarketer analyst Paul Verna talks about why Netflix has started showing promotional videos, and how subscribers have reacted to the commercial-like format.