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eMarketer forecasting analyst Eric Haggstrom walks us through the current cord-cutting climate, explains why CBS is suing Locast and what Dish has been up to. Vice president of content studio Paul Verna joins the discussion to chat about streaming service password sharing, a new Facebook TV video-calling device, Spotify Q2 results and more.

eMarketer principal analyst Nicole Perrin and head of content studio Paul Verna discuss the Department of Justice’s new antitrust review, why consumers only consider a few brands, NBCUniversal’s streaming service launch date and Microsoft's Cortana.

eMarketer analyst Ross Benes and vice president of content studio Paul Verna discuss Netflix's first-ever quarterly subscriber loss. They also consider other implications from the company's lower-than-expected Q2 2019 earnings, including the effect of a recent price hike on the company's revenues, the competitive landscape and the cost of funding original and licensed content.

The appeal of traditional media with consumers in Germany is still strong compared with the rest of Europe, despite our estimates that time spent with media there will begin to plateau next year.

Mary Meeker, “queen of the internet” and venture capitalist at Bond Capital, released her highly anticipated annual “Internet Trends Report” and touched on everything from digital media usage in the US to consumer confidence in China in the 333-slide presentation she gave at the Recode Code Conference earlier this month.

Despite the rapid rise of digital, time spent with traditional media remains dominant in France. However, as consumers max out on how much they can multitask per day and reach a media saturation point, total time spent with media will likely plateau in the next several years.

Digital's share of time spent is above 50% in China, US, UK, South Korea and Canada, but under 50% in France, Germany, Japan and India. 

For the first time ever, US consumers will spend more time using their mobile devices than they will spend watching TV, with smartphone use dominating that time spent.

Adults in France continue to devote more time to digital, especially video: Total viewing time (TV and digital video) remains steady, meaning viewers are replacing time spent with TV for digital video. This year, for the first time, digital video time will surpass 20% of total viewing time.

Subscription fatigue be damned. More than a third of Americans believe they will increase the number of subscription services they use in the next two years, but interest isn’t the same across all categories.

In the second of two special episodes of “Behind the Numbers,” we look back at two key digital trends from earlier this year: digital privacy concerns and the acceleration of cord-cutting.

eMarketer analyst Ross Benes and forecasting analyst Eric Haggstrom ponder the future of the video industry as the streaming wars heat up. How will new services reshape the landscape? What will happen to the quality of TV programming? And when the dust clears, who will be the winners and losers?

eMarketer principal analysts Karin von Abrams and Nicole Perrin discuss France's new tax and its impact on US tech companies. They also discuss how people use Google, whether customers find Netflix too pricey, Brits' knowledge of Disney+ and more.

In a significant move for the company's larger advertising goals, Amazon is rebranding its barely six-month-old streaming service to further ramp up its ad-supported video strategy.

Consumers in the UK are barely increasing their time spent with media, and similar to the rest of the world, time spent with mobile becomes a major driver of digital growth.

Connected TV inventory is growing like weeds. We expect that more than half of the US population (57.2%) will watch connected TV in 2019, up from 51.7% in 2017. And the time they spend watching will increase too, which means the amount of connected TV inventory available to advertisers is proliferating.

This year, for the first time, adults in China will spend over half of their daily media time on the internet. This is largely a result of increased government efforts to transform and develop internet infrastructure in the more rural parts of the country.

Many Americans believe they will use more subscription services in the future. But when it comes to video streaming, just because there are more options doesn't mean consumers will drastically increase the number of services they're willing to pay for.

eMarketer senior forecasting analyst Oscar Orozco digs into our numbers for video viewers in China and stacks them up against other countries, including the US. Watch now.

As more cord-cutters supplement traditional television with digital offerings, many in the TV industry are keen on the growing practice of combining linear OTT subscriptions with on-demand streaming.