Video

Apple’s 1TB iPhone would tap high-quality video demand but likely won’t come cheap: The company is reportedly adding a 1TB storage option for the top-line iPhone of its new fleet.

Disney sets exclusive theatrical windows for the rest of 2021: The switch in strategy between “Black Widow” and “Shang-Chi” demonstrates the challenge of balancing box office and streaming subscriber revenue.

In North America, TV is the dominant screen for viewing OTT video content, accounting for 82% of time spent on the activity in Q2 2021.

TikTok star Addison Rae’s deal with Netflix shows how brands will find their next collaborator: The multifilm agreement demonstrates the importance of partnering with creators who have built-in followings.

Amazon’s new smart TVs will disrupt both the connected TV (CTV) and TV measurement industries: Amazon Fire TV is already a major player, but its new CTV lines will let it take advantage of the ongoing fracturing of TV measurement.

Spotify’s hire of a former Paramount+ exec hints at video, original content expansion: Spotify has spent the last year and a half bringing podcasters on board and launching popular original shows, and this new hire could help broaden its scope.

Disney's exclusive theatrical runs come back with "Shang-Chi": The Marvel movie will only come to Disney+ after 45 days—and while that's better than straight-to-streaming, it's still an adjustment for theaters used to 90-day runs.

Android users spent more time watching TikTok than YouTube in the US: YouTube still reigns overall, but it could be ceding ground on mobile devices.

We spoke with Calum Smeaton, founder and CEO at cross-platform TV measurement firm TVSquared, about how advertisers are making their video spend work better for them and how direct-to-consumer (D2C) brands have led the way in this regard.

Around the world, mobile is the No. 1 device for watching YouTube, capturing 63% of the platform’s video views in Q2 2021.

The fall TV blitz may not be enough to undo new viewing habits: Broadcasters may not be able to reverse pandemic-era trends, and the number of new streaming services is putting a strain on viewers' wallets.

Grab the scissors: Sling TV's launch of its new Barstool Sports Channel is just one of the many ways skinny bundles can incentivize sports fans to cut the cord.

There will be 23.6 million YouTube Premium subscribers by the end of the year, which is up a healthy 18% over 2020.

On today's episode, we discuss how sports are consumed worldwide: Was viewership of the Olympics down outside the US, are digital platforms making any progress on sports rights, and what do we expect from future major sporting events? Tune in to the discussion as eMarketer principal analyst Bill Fisher hosts research analyst Man-Chung Cheung and principal analyst Paul Briggs.

On today's episode, we discuss whether TikTok is actually a top choice for social advertisers, how it compares with other ad channels, and what to make of the companies current shopping efforts. We then talk about Facebook's "meaningful pivot" around its ad business, the latest Federal Trade Commission suit against the social giant, and whether Reels on the blue app has potential. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analyst at Insider Intelligence Debra Aho Williamson.

TikTok is extending its video length again: The app recently rolled out 3-minute videos, but it's extending the length to 5 minutes in an attempt to compete with YouTube

TikTok’s Shopping tab marks a big but necessary shift: The feature will let select Shopify merchants add product catalogs to their profiles, likely the first of many interface changes to facilitate ecommerce on the TikTok.

A recent wave of hate speech has driven Twitch streamers to organize a boycott: A sitewide boycott is planned for September 1 by streamers frustrated with Twitch's repeated inaction against hate speech.

Streaming services will have to go beyond video in order to stay competitive: As viewers question how cost-effective cord-cutting is, streaming services are thinking outside "business as usual" to retain customers.