Video

Netflix is forecast to spend more on original programming than ever before, splitting its global content budget almost evenly between that and licensing costs.

Social platforms use holiday shopping season to boost livestream ecommerce: Facebook and Pinterest are hoping the holidays can help increase consumers' adoption of their live shopping features.

The video game livestreaming wars are heating up: Both Facebook Gaming and YouTube Gaming are aggressively rolling out incentives for streamers to leave the reigning streaming site, Twitch.

Snap's deal to bring NBCU audio clips to the app is a win-win: Better video creation tools gives Snap a boost over TikTok and gives NBCU a new way to promote its shows and movies to Gen Z.

Peacock’s Q3 losses hit $520 million as it fails to land a big hit: The streamer’s lack of a pop culture hit and live event mixups make the tightening streaming market hurt twice as much.

Faze Clan's public offering will be a proving ground for public creator economy companies: The organization started in 2010—before influencers and creators were the norm—and its market performance could foreshadow similar moves from newer companies.

Baby boomers are the only generation in the US that watches cable TV in significant numbers.

Spotify’s video podcasting push could bring in more users and marketers: Podcasts are already gaining steam with both groups, and video will help make the medium—and ads in it—even more engaging.

Twitch viewing remains strong and helped create a hit game for its parent company: Amazon Games’ latest release has enjoyed a month of success thanks to cross-promotion on the wildly popular streaming platform.

Pinterest's new TikTok-like feature is more of a video discovery tool than an outright clone: Videos on the new Watch tab won't be separate from normal in-feed videos, so marketers don't need to develop entirely new campaigns around the feature like they had to with Instagram Reels.

YouTube is carving into social commerce and TV measurement: The platform is leveraging both its deep pool of creators and large TV-based audience to get a leg up on competitors.

Disney+ isn’t immune to streaming saturation woes: CEO Bob Chapek warned that the subscriber base would grow slower than expected, a sign that the domestic streaming market is closing up.

Apple TV+’s shows are among the most heavily pirated in streaming: Apple has hired third-party copyright protection firms to protect its properties, but they’re doing little to stop piracy at a time when every subscriber counts.

YouTube videos are the most popular media among US children online, with 85% of those surveyed watching that content recently.

A standard currency for TV and digital is unlikely, despite buyers’ wishes: Media buyers want more connection between linear and streaming TV, and though individual networks are making strides, an industrywide solution is unlikely.

Though HBO Max did not come close to reaching 100 million US viewers over the period of our previous forecast, we now project the streaming platform will cross that threshold in 2023.

Netflix and Walmart’s partnership lets both swing back at Amazon: The deal is part of Netflix’s ongoing attempt to diversify through merchandise and other revenue streams.

In September, we raised our forecast for HBO Max viewers. We now believe that HBO Max will have nearly 80 million monthly viewers this year, and that it will surpass 100 million viewers by the end of 2023. Previously, we did not expect HBO Max to break 100 million viewers by the end of our forecast period in 2025.

YouTube’s Partner Program report shows the creator economy is here to stay: The company has paid out $30 billion to creators, artists, and media companies in the last three years.