Demographics


While kids are not likely to own a smartphone or have a large social media presence, video dominates their digital activity.

Every week on eMarketer’s “Behind the Numbers” podcast, we take a few minutes to discuss some of the most intriguing headlines of the past seven days. This week, we're chatting about Amazon's controversial HQ2 (er, 3) decision. Plus: Juul's move to quit social, and the rise of the nanoinfluencer.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," we dig into a new study about YouTube usage. What kinds of content are users consuming, and what drives additional views?

Unsurprisingly, seniors are the least likely adults to use any voice technology. According to our estimates, 3.8 million seniors in the US will use a smart speaker this year.

This year, 8.2 million baby boomers in the US will use a smart speaker. That's a 28.6% increase from 2017, according to eMarketer estimates.

This year, 24.9 million US millennials will use a smart speaker. That's more than a third of the millennial population and a 38.3% increase from 2017, according to eMarketer estimates.

This year, 84.8 million people in the US—or roughly a quarter of the population—will use Snapchat, a 7.1% increase from 2017, according to eMarketer estimates.

Earlier this week, Apple CEO Tim Cook praised the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation and advocated for stricter privacy laws in the US. Whenever the head of the world’s first $1 trillion company applauds regulation, people take notice. But Cook isn’t the only one in the business world who believes more data laws are coming our way.

Joshua Dyck, professor and co-director of the Center for Public Opinion at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, discusses why esports has drawn so many teens, and how advertisers can insert themselves into the gaming community.

This year, 55.2 million people in the US will use Twitter. That's 16.8% of the population and a 0.9% increase from 2017, according to eMarketer estimates.

As digital marketing becomes more automated, marketers are allocating more of their budgets to marketing technology. Research indicates CMOs spend about 30% of their budgets on tech products.

Store closures are the hallmark of the so-called retail apocalypse, but the demise of brick-and-mortar locations might be more apparent to industry watchers. The average consumer doesn't always pay attention—unless a particular store meant something to them.

Even with the ubiquity of digital buying, the in-store shopping experience continues to have importance. And even more so with younger consumers.

Buying store brands used to be viewed as sacrificing quality for price, but post-recession private labels began flourishing and have gained popularity with retailers and consumers over the past decade.

Younger Gen Xers and older millennials behave similarly when it comes to smart speakers. Like millennials, Gen Xers are also early adopters of the technology, though at a slightly lower level.

Kids and teens may not be old enough to buy a smart speaker, but that's not stopping them from spending a lot of time with voice technology.

As smartphone ownership becomes the norm among teens, the device dominates their overall digital usage. And even teens themselves wonder whether they use it too much.

No shock, the most popular shopping site with teens is practically everyone's favorite online retailer. Yes, Amazon. But this group also has a high preference for brick-and-mortar stores.

Heather Watson, consulting and behavioral insights lead at research and solutions firm CGK, discusses how to market to teens on YouTube and the importance of having an authentic brand personality across platforms.

This year, 169.5 million people in the US—or more than half of the population—will use Facebook, a 0.9% increase from 2017, according to eMarketer estimates.