Demographics


Though lagging millennial women in some respects, millennial men make more money and are more upbeat about their finances.

With consumer confidence hovering near record highs, consumers are set to bump up their holiday spending this year.

Many consumers understand how companies use their personal data, but according to a recent study, not everyone is comfortable with it.

A new survey suggests that Facebook users are aggressively deleting the app from their phones—but are they really? In the latest episode of eMarketer’s “Behind the Numbers,” we dig into the data about social network users and their attitudes about privacy. How is Facebook’s usage holding up amidst continuing scrutiny of its business?

A survey of US and UK millennials found that—surprise—many would be comfortable using a variety of new technologies while shopping.

The number of Facebook users in the US will inch up 0.9% this year to 169.5 million. While growth has plateaued, Facebook is still the most used social network among all age groups, except for teens.

Snapchat will overtake Facebook among 18- to 24-year-olds this year, according to eMarketer’s latest forecast on social network usage.

Every week on eMarketer’s “Behind the Numbers” podcast, we take a few minutes to discuss some of the most intriguing headlines of the past seven days. This week, some of the topics we’re talking about include how teens are turning to Instagram to make some extra money, plus how ecommerce and low prices may be turning some consumers into hoarders.

Social media usage—both for personal and business use—is so widespread that occasional social implosions are relatively commonplace. How widespread? eMarketer estimates that roughly nine out of 10 companies use social networks as a marketing tool, and that level of involvement has been steady for years.

About one in five affluent consumers in the US make no use of any technology while in stores. That’s right: no price checks on a smartphone while shopping, no taking pictures of products and certainly no mobile payments.

Stephen Driscoll, vice president of marketing at AARP, discusses why email has remained relevant for marketers in today's fast-paced digital world.

When a consumer finds a product they like, they tend to become repeat customers. However, a recent survey found that some consumers—particularly Gen Z and millennials—are not always ready to commit to one product.

Apps vs. mobile sites has been the subject of debate since the dawn of smartphones. For a period it seemed like apps fell out of favor, but there is proof that trend is reversing in the retail industry.

According to a May 2018 survey from Dotcom Distribution, something as small as a free sticker can leave an impression—and not only make them more likely to make future purchases, but to also recommend that brand to others.

It's not easy to quantify whether consumers are spending more on minimalist lifestyles or just becoming more discerning about the things they do spend money on. The rise of private labels and consumers caring less about specific brands of household goods, food and clothing speaks to a shift in values.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," eMarketer's Mark Dolliver discusses how teens indulge in too much screen time, and the extent to which they and their parents see this excessive usage as a problem.

For many back-to-school shoppers, finding quality items is important, as is spending as little time as possible in the store. But nothing beats a good deal.

Older teens and young adults aren't as reliant on mobile as you might think. They use smartphones to browse, compare and research, but they aren’t avid users of transactional mcommerce.

Nowhere is the shift from offline to online booking more pronounced than in China. Digital travel sales in the region will total $133.90 billion in 2018, a 20.5% increase over 2017.

We let the eMarketer interns take over the studio for a day so they could explain their digital behaviors to the world. Are these younger folks using Facebook the way they used to? What do they use each of the social media platforms for? What do they think about digital advertising? How do their spending habits vary?