Video

On today's episode, we discuss what an out-of-home (OOH) advertising comeback will look like and which areas are driving growth. We also examine how OOH movie theater advertising could recover, the significance of March Madness's return, when people will want to attend sporting events again, and replacing "primetime" with something more personal. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer forecasting analyst Nazmul Islam and senior analyst at Insider Intelligence Ross Benes.

Triller gets ready for livestreams: With livestreaming quickly becoming a social platform must-have, Triller will need that capability from Verzuz in order to stay competitive.

HBO Max sells big in upfronts: The company has reportedly pulled in $80 million for its upcoming ad-supported tier, but to keep that momentum it will need to live up to its big subscriber number promises.

Livestreaming is a small but growing part of creator culture. Much like Stories, livestreaming is a way for creators and other influential figures on social media to present content that is often less polished than photos or recorded video. Livestreams also give influencers a way to interact with their audience in real time through live chat.

On today's episode, we discuss whether sports are the key to moving viewers from TVs to streaming platforms, if online audiences can ever rival TV viewership, and whether people will want to watch user-generated or professionally made content online. We then talk about the most interesting part of The Walt Disney Co.'s streaming endeavors, how HBO Max stacks up so far, and how this second year of virtual upfronts might be different. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer senior analyst at Insider Intelligence Ross Benes.

Say goodbye to your ex’s Netflix: The streamer is testing an anti-account-sharing measure, likely in an attempt to keep growing as it approaches saturation in its biggest markets.

HBO Max adds ads: The ad-supported tier is coming in June, helping the streamer reach a wider audience and giving marketers access to a large chunk of premium programming to advertise against.

On today's episode, we discuss how the coronavirus changed each generation, Twitter's ecommerce ambitions, what consumers want from brands one year into the pandemic, Virginia becoming the second state to enact a consumer privacy law, TikTok competitors from YouTube and Netflix, how to improve your art viewing experience, and more. Tune in to listen to the discussion with eMarketer principal analyst Jeremy Goldman, analyst Blake Droesch, and director of forecasting at Insider Intelligence Oscar Orozco.

Facebook competes for creators: The platform is appealing to creators who specialize in short videos and livestreams by introducing new monetization options.

Content is king: Roku's new scripted series for The Roku Channel will help it draw viewership with more original and exclusive content.

Disney hits subscriber goals early and isn't slowing down: The company is working to drive more attention to ESPN+ with a Hulu integration and a new NHL rights deal.

As more viewers leave traditional TV packages for streaming alternatives, there is a heightened interest in how much money is being spent on video subscriptions and which companies are benefiting from changes in consumer viewing patterns.

On today's episode, we discuss free, ad-supported video: Who are the major players, how do these services fit into people’s media diets, and how do they attract advertisers? Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer senior forecasting analyst Eric Haggstrom and forecasting analyst at Insider Intelligence Nazmul Islam.

On today's episode, we discuss Twitter's "Super Follows" and "Communities" features, what annoys online shoppers, whether a foldable iPhone is coming, if Paramount+ can fit into people's media diets, Instagram's new Live Rooms offering, where to find a true wonder of the world, and more. Tune in to listen to the discussion with eMarketer principal analysts Jillian Ryan and Yoram Wurmser, and analyst at Insider Intelligence Blake Droesch.

Disney's pivot to streaming is ramping up: Streaming is beginning to perform better than both its theatrical and TV segments, which makes it very likely that the company will focus more heavily on streaming in the future.

The rest of the world is waking up to the potential of shoppable livestreams, but it’s old news to China’s short-form video players and ecommerce platforms. Short-video leaders Douyin (TikTok’s sister app) and Kuaishou (known outside of China as Kwai) have been expanding their social commerce operations, not just to sell products, but to provide services and other forms of content as well.

On today's episode, we discuss whether Disney+ can overtake Netflix as the top streaming service and how important subscription bundles will be in the future. We then talk about which of the streaming platforms is winning the "original" and "exclusive" content battle, Netflix's free content strategy, and AT&T's plans for DirecTV. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer senior analyst at Insider Intelligence Ross Benes.

Streaming gains for all: AMC Networks announced it had topped 6 million streaming subscribers at the end of 2020, surpassing initial projections.

The pros and cons of Paramount+: The ViacomCBS streamer has a massive content library and good brand recognition, but its basic tier needs to offer a good enough experience to attract advertisers and new users, especially as the pandemic-induced streaming boom dwindles.

YouTube lets parents guide their kids' video exploration: The video platform's new controls will give parents the ability to specify what's appropriate or not based on three tiers tied to age groups.