Advertising & Marketing

Brands are pulling or pausing their ad spending as the COVID-19 crisis puts a strain on their businesses, but new research shows that consumers may not want them to stop advertising altogether.

With the coronavirus pandemic keeping most people worldwide at home, media consumption is up. But with an economic slowdown crashing markets and supply chains disrupted by the virus, many advertisers are pulling or pausing spend—meaning increases in media engagement aren’t translating into increased ad revenues.

US spending on search advertising will decline by between 8.7% and 14.8% in H1 2020. That’s about $6 billion to $8 billion less than we expected. Our previous forecast of US digital ad spending, completed on March 6, 2020, called for a 14.4% increase in search ad spending for all of 2020.

Many local businesses are feeling the brunt of the coronavirus pandemic. More than a third of local marketers worldwide said they’re losing customers as a result of COVID-19, according to a March 2020 survey from BrightLocal.

In this episode hosted by eMarketer global director of public relations Douglas Clark, vice president of forecasting Monica Peart sheds light on how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting eMarketer’s traditional ad spending forecasts.

eMarketer senior analyst Paul Briggs, principal analyst Mark Dolliver and senior analyst Bill Fisher discuss how trust in the media is changing in the US, UK and Canada. They then talk about brands repurposing sports budgets, the English Premier League considering a direct-to-consumer streaming service and how advertisers' messaging tone differs between countries.

Over the past few weeks, retailers have closed their stores indefinitely as the coronavirus continues to spread in the US. Many brands, like athletic apparel seller Vuori, have shifted their focus to ecommerce and social media channels to stay connected to customers. We recently spoke with Vuori's founder, Joe Kudla, about his company's direct-to-consumer (D2C) beginnings, as well as its ongoing efforts during the pandemic.

New polls on consumer responses to the coronavirus pandemic reveal that when it comes to fear, finances and boredom, generational stereotypes may not hold true.

eMarketer principal analysts Mark Dolliver, Andrew Lipsman and Nicole Perrin discuss lessons that businesses can take from the last recession and the effect it had on ad spending. How will digital hold up? Which channels are advertisers pulling back from? Will the US stimulus package help? They then talk about what consumers will likely spend less on if they lose their jobs, why Twitter will now allow COVID-19 ads and the knock-on effects of moving Amazon Prime Day.

eMarketer principal analyst Nicole Perrin looks at what consumers expect to see from brands during the pandemic. She then discusses Google now allowing COVID-19 ads to run on its platforms, the T-Mobile and Sprint merger being finalized and how radio has been performing recently.

Juan Lavista, LATAM marketing and insights head at MercadoLibre Advertising, speaks with eMarketer vice president of business development Marissa Coslov about the ecommerce technology firm's response to the coronavirus pandemic, how marketers are adjusting their advertising campaigns in the wake of the crisis, and the most searched products in Latin America. Made possible by Salesforce.

eMarketer principal analysts Andrew Lipsman and Nicole Perrin discuss what consumers expect, and don't expect, from advertisements during the pandemic and provide some examples. They then talk about the Amazon and Instacart protest implications, the United Nation's call to creatives and how bad the retail store closures picture could look this year.

US marketers allocated more than $7 billion in digital ad spending to YouTube last year, eMarketer estimates, up 15.1% over 2018 spending levels. That resulted in more than $3.4 billion in net ad revenues for the video-sharing giant, with most of the remainder going to content creators.

eMarketer principal analyst Victoria Petrock discusses how emerging tech innovations like social virtual reality, smart homes and 5G connectivity have shown new promise during the pandemic.

The Great Recession was a low point in the recorded history of advertising. Total media ad spending declined for two straight years in the US, and digital ad spending even dropped in absolute terms in 2009, the only time that’s ever happened. But most of the buy-side decision-makers surveyed in late March 2020 by the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) think the coronavirus pandemic will have an even worse effect on US ad budgets.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver, junior analyst Blake Droesch and vice president of content studio Paul Verna discuss if people are falling back in love with their TVs, if online video dating will work, why we can't (yet) trust the internet, brands building goodwill during the pandemic, the un-college movement, what the average person looks like and more.

As governments pass stringent social distancing restrictions and corporations request employees to work from home in order to mitigate the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, business as usual is no longer usual. More than half (52.2%) of US business professionals surveyed by communication platform Fishbowl said their workplace has restricted travel or encouraged remote work due to the coronavirus.

With large sectors of the economy unable to do business as usual, many marketers have paused or changed media plans. In one potential early sign of the tough times to come for digital advertising, Twitter updated its guidance to investors earlier this week and announced that it expects to see a drop in Q1 2020 revenues, on a year-over-year basis, due to the coronavirus pandemic.

With the ever-changing situation surrounding the coronavirus outbreak, it is unclear how long the pandemic will last and what its effect on the economy—and therefore the TV industry—will be.

Having experienced the frustrations of shopping for underwear and socks firsthand, Brian Berger, founder and CEO of men’s lifestyle brand Mack Weldon, set out to reinvent men’s basics.