Mobile

Meta touts commercial possibilities of messaging: New WhatsApp API and business messaging features offer ways to diversify revenue as ad segment comes under pressure.

Chip companies could pivot to cloud and services: Expecting a slowdown in chip sales, companies like Broadcom are leaning on software and cloud computing acquisitions with companies like VMware to diversify their business.

Runway gains first mover advantage with direct-to-consumer travel telehealth: It’s replacing expensive and antiquated travel clinics with online $30 pre-trip consultations and medications, disrupting a $12 billion market.

Canada ramps up 5G security: Huawei and ZTE solutions are banned. Critics say the move comes a little too late as telecoms bear the burden of replacing without disruption by June 2024.

Gaming smartphones could be the next key mobile segment: Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon processors might establish a new breed of gaming-centric devices.

On today's episode, we discuss how much TikTok is making from advertising revenues, the most interesting thing to note about its users, and some of the most interesting ways advertisers are engaging on TikTok. "In Other News," we talk about what the best social commerce experience is and the big takeaway from Instagram letting users share nonfungible tokens (NFTs). Tune in to the discussion with our analysts Jasmine Enberg and Zach Goldner.

Musk says he’d consider turning Twitter into a super app with a strong payments focus and pointed to WeChat as a “good model.”

On today's episode, we discuss how a Netflix tier with ads could affect the company, its users, and advertisers, what price point it may come in at, how many users will switch over, and what advertisers should make of this potential inventory. "In Other News," we talk about how much overlay ads move the needle and Peacock's new In-Scene Ads. Tune in to the discussion with our analysts Paul Verna and Ross Benes.

Lockdowns and crackdowns crimp growth in China: Tencent’s ad revenues decreased dramatically due to Shanghai shutdown as well as dissolution of the after-school tutoring industry.

Apple, Netflix woo $490 billion market: Both companies announce new features in honor of Global Accessibility Awareness Day (May 19).

Southeast Asia emerges as a mobile-first consumer economy: Online food delivery, grocery sales, and digital payments to benefit as internet accessibility expands in the region.

The average number of smartphone apps used in the US will decrease over the next few years, following a pandemic-driven bump in 2020 that did not change the overall trend. This year, users will access an average of 20.4 apps each month, a figure that will drop to 19.7 in 2026.

Chipmakers faced with huge stockpiles: The war in Ukraine and China shutdowns are taking their toll on the PC and smartphone market. Manufacturers might have to pivot to produce chips for other uses.

Consumers want to search visually: A rising number of consumers are using Google to search using its Lens feature.

On today's episode, we discuss how wearable tech devices will shake up healthcare, which features will make health wearables a must-have, and how Amazon and Apple will continue to disrupt the industry. "In Other News," we talk about why digital pharmacies are getting in trouble and what we should make of telehealth companies slowing down. Tune in to the discussion with our analysts Lisa Phillips and Rajiv Leventhal.

TikTok’s new user insights tool has some gaps: The publicly accessible tool is missing key data points compared with competitive offerings

On today's episode, we discuss how many people are cryptocurrency owners, which direct-to-consumer companies are leading the category, and what Meta's overall ad revenues total up to. "In Other News," we talk about the number of people who aren't using the internet and whether consumer enthusiasm for DoorDash will remain high. Tune in to the discussion with our analysts Whitney Birdsall and Nazmul Islam.

In a world of ubiquitous robocalls, brands need to differentiate themselves if they want consumers to pick up. One option could be logos. Some 69% of US adults ages 18 to 24 say they would answer a call if their phone displayed a recognizable brand logo. This figure decreases with age, and just 46% of US adults ages 55 to 62 say they'd pick up if they recognized a brand logo.