Social Media

Even amid swirling controversies, Facebook is the single most popular US social network, with 83% of adult social media users in the US reporting that they visit the platform in a typical week.

Three in five US internet users said that discounts are what influence them to buy a product through social media ads, far more than the 44% who cited the brand’s trustworthiness and customer data practices.

The company could reveal a new overarching brand name as soon as next week and follow in the footsteps of Alphabet.

Pinterest's new TikTok-like feature is more of a video discovery tool than an outright clone: Videos on the new Watch tab won't be separate from normal in-feed videos, so marketers don't need to develop entirely new campaigns around the feature like they had to with Instagram Reels.

Facebook turns to EU to help develop its metaverse: The company plans to hire 10,000 EU residents in the next five years, with “highly specialized engineers” at the top of its wish list.

Internal Facebook documents appear to contradict claims made by the company around how well its AI tools find and remove harmful content.

A report from TikTok paints a clearer picture of how consumers shop on social media: The research comes as TikTok and other competitors launch a bevy of new social commerce features.

With LinkedIn’s China closure, the balance of tech soft power could be shifting: LinkedIn shut its doors in China, but Chinese companies like TikTok still operate freely in the US, which could become a pain point for the US government once again.

On today's episode, we discuss some suggested ways to rein Facebook in, a newly proposed social media model, the significance of the customer experience gap, what to expect from the new Instagram TV, how to create good thought leadership, when the best days to go into the office are, the scientific reason dogs are the best, and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer director of reports editing Rahul Chadha, analyst Blake Droesch, and principal analyst at Insider Intelligence Paul Verna.

Twitter’s ad-centric days aren’t over yet: The platform is still developing new advertising features that take user feedback into account.

Social media platforms in Australia could soon be on the hook for defamation or abuse posted by users: The country continues its year-long crackdown on Big Tech by proposing a measure which would force platforms to adopt new moderation policies, fast.

YouTube videos are the most popular media among US children online, with 85% of those surveyed watching that content recently.

On today's episode, we discuss all of the latest Facebook revelations that have come from former employee turned whistleblower Frances Haugen: Is Facebook really having its "Big Tobacco" moment, why it's unlikely we will be talking about this in a month, and how might Facebook be forced to change how it does business. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer senior analyst at Insider Intelligence Audrey Schomer.

Twitter attempts to catch up to competitors’ advertising lead: The platform announced a few incremental improvements to its ad products—but will they be enough to compete with Facebook’s dominance?

Facebook won't measure unlinked Instagram and Facebook accounts in the name of privacy: Advertisers' data may be less exact, but it's a necessary move for Facebook to ward off more scrutiny.

Social media platforms are betting on social audio as part of the creator economy: Live audio is becoming less about the platforms that started the trend as more big firms launch creator-focused features.

Snapchat’s new mental health initiative shows the image problem facing Big Tech: The platform and its competitors are racing to preempt regulator criticisms of their impact on teens in the midst of a battle for new users.

Trust in mass media is down—but social media isn’t a perfect alternative: Media confidence is highly split on partisan lines, and using social media for news can reproduce the same problems.

Governments and businesses now see the value of local innovation to wean off dependence on Big Tech.