Travel


As layoffs pile up and many industries like retail and travel continue to struggle amid lower consumer spending, confidence in a near-term economic recovery is low.

According to July 2020 data from MMGY Global, 64% of US travelers said they expect to book their next leisure trip within the next six months or less.

Amid the pandemic, many adults in the US aren’t ready to get on a plane anytime soon—especially if it’s packed.

With the coronavirus still looming across the country, 54% of US internet users indicated that feeling safe is the most important factor when booking their next vacation.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, demand for traveling dropped off significantly, especially in the US and UK, two of the hardest hit countries. The situation is exacerbated by a halt in business traveling and cruise ships worldwide.

Wendy Olson Killion, global vice president of business development for Expedia Group Media Solutions, joins eMarketer vice president of business development Marissa Coslov to discuss how the online travel company is adjusting to disruption in the industry. Made possible by Salesforce.

As normal life slowly resumes China, consumers are eager to travel again, albeit with reservations. Polls show that some consumers may start trekking as early as this month, but will mainly stay within the country’s borders.

eMarketer principal analyst Nicole Perrin discusses how the coronavirus will impact tourism. How will it change airlines, accommodation and travel-related ad spending? She then discusses what will happen to movie theaters and ride-hailing services as the pandemic takes hold.

As the coronavirus continues to spread, China's status as the epicenter of major supply chains is causing significant changes to businesses and consumer behavior. This is not only putting a strain on multiple industries within the country, but multinationals operating out of and doing business in China are feeling the effects as well.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver, junior analyst Blake Droesch and vice president of content studio Paul Verna talk about CCPA's arrival, TikTok's recent security and misinformation issues, Spotify's position on political ads, Facebook's deepfake ban, Delta Air Lines's "binge button" and more.

eMarketer principal analysts Mark Dolliver and Nicole Perrin and junior analyst at Insider Intelligence Blake Droesch discuss when the travel industry will recover, Facebook merging its apps' messaging services, corporate culture suffering with remote work, Google's "People Cards," social media ad load, what are we born afraid of and more.

Consumers aren’t quite ready to book their next trip, let alone stay in a hotel. But many are taking note of what they’ll feel comfortable with when that time comes, according to May polling from Skift and Oracle.

Few industries have been hit as hard by the coronavirus as travel. Recovery will be slow, with many sectors not returning to pre-pandemic levels until at least 2022. Some pandemic-related trends, like increased local “staycations,” may persist.

Many US adults are standing behind any potential actions airlines and airports plan to take in response to the pandemic, according to May 2020 data from YouGov.

Consumers may not be able to travel at the moment, but that doesn’t mean they’re not thinking about what their next vacation looks like.

Once the pandemic ends, consumers are likely going to continue doing things that they've become accustomed to doing while sheltering in place.

In a signal that it has flattened the curve, China reported zero new domestically transmitted cases of COVID-19 in the mainland last month, though that may slightly change as there have been cases brought back by overseas returnees. (Additionally, there is some speculation around the accuracy of these reports.) Editors Note: Since this article's original publication, one county in China has gone into total lockdown again amid fear of a second wave of COVID-19 cases.

The coronavirus pandemic is touching all aspects of daily life in the UK and around the world. From an industry perspective, those most affected thus far rely on movement of people, particularly travel and hospitality. Some have been able to adapt to this new reality, sustained largely by digital, but the hospitality sector is grappling with an environment where human contact of any kind is becoming increasingly limited, even when mediated by digital.

In a marketplace crowded with competition, ride-hailing pioneer Uber still dominates the US transportation-sharing economy. But as the first mover's growth slows, its main competitor Lyft will increasingly claim market share.

eMarketer junior forecasting analyst Nazmul Islam and principal analyst Victoria Petrock discuss how Americans are using smart speakers today and how that will morph into ambient computing in the future. They also talk about the rise of spam calls, how Americans travel for the holidays and the cloud gaming wars.